2014 Student Success Scorecard

By Marci Myers

It is that time of year again. The 2014 Student Success Scorecard is here!

Released in April 2014, the Student Success Scorecard is annually reported by the Chancellor’s Office. The Scorecard data is available for each of the 112 community colleges to inform how well colleges are doing in remedial instruction, job training programs, retention of students and graduation and completion rates.

Here are some system-wide highlights from 2013:

  • 167,946 certificates/degrees system-wide
  • Effects of budget constraints: Enrolled students dropped 22% in 5 years and CSU transfers declined by 20%
  • 77% of students are unprepared for college
  • College readiness linked to completion: 71% of prepared students complete, while only 41% of unprepared students do.

72% of El Camino College students and 90% of Compton Center students from the most recent Scorecard cohort were unprepared for college.

ECCCCCheck out these 2014 Scorecard Summaries for each campus:

2014 Scorecard Summary Page – Compton Center

2014 Scorecard Summary Page – ECC

Or explore the Scorecard on the CCCCO website.

 

El Camino College Assessment Test Results by Gender and Ethnicity: Fall 2009 – Fall 2013

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ECC Transfer-level placements by ethnicity

Earlier this month, we released reports examining the placement scores of recent high school graduate students (“El Camino College Assessment Test Results Fall 2009-Fall 2013”). Recently, we took a closer look at student placements in reading, writing, and math classes separated out by gender and ethnicity at both ECC and ECC Compton Center.

The class in which a student is placed can be very important; a student placed into a transfer-level course is beginning begins several semesters closer to a degree or transfer than a student placed into a basic skills course. For example, a student who places into the most remedial math class offered at ECC (basic arithmetic) is three levels below degree credit and four levels before transfer credit courses. This translates to at least three terms of math before a student can take a course to satisfy the math requirement for a degree and four terms of math before the student can take transfer-level math.

There are several interesting findings at ECC. First, men were more likely than women to place into transfer-level math (and conversely, women were more likely than men to place into basic skills math). Second, both African American and Latino students were less likely than White students to be placed into transfer-level and more likely to be placed into basic skills reading, writing, and math. African American and Latino students were also less likely than White students to be placed into English 1A.

There are also several interesting findings from Compton Center. Similar to ECC, both African American and Latino students were less likely to be placed into transfer-level and more likely to be placed into basic skills reading, writing, and math than White students. African American and Latino students were also less likely than White students to be placed into English 1A. Second, men were more likely than women to place into transfer-level reading and math.

These placement figures should be considered when planning interventions to encourage student success at ECC. It should also be noted that assessment placements are only one of the multiple measures that can be used by counselors to determine the appropriate class placement for a student. Counselors may also consider high school grades and GPA, high school courses taken, AP test scores, faculty assessment, and Early Assessment Program (EAP) test results.

To read the full reports, as well as many other student outcome reports, click here.

 

By Preston Reed, PhD

El Camino College Assessment Test Results Fall 2009 – Fall 2013

5-year_placements

ECC Placement Rates Fall 2009 – 2013

As we progress through summer break, a whole new cohort of recent high school graduates are preparing to start at El Camino College (ECC) in the fall. After applying, one of the first steps that incoming students complete is to take placement tests for reading, writing, math, English as a Second Language (ESL), or chemistry. We recently released reports examining 5-year placement trends for incoming high school students at both ECC and ECC Compton Center.

 

The reading, writing, and math tests place students in a variety of levels depending on test performance. For this report, placements are grouped into categories of similarly-leveled courses. These groups are 1) transfer-level—courses that are equivalent to courses at a 4-year institution, 2) college-preparatory—courses that immediately precede transfer-level courses, and 3) basic skills—courses defined by ECC as basic skills courses (in most cases, more than one level below transfer).

 

The class in which a student is placed can be very important; a student placed into a transfer-level course is beginning begins several semesters closer to a degree or transfer than a student placed into a basic skills course. For example, a student who places into the most remedial math class offered at ECC (basic arithmetic) is three levels below degree credit and four levels before transfer credit courses. This translates to at least three terms of math before a student can take a course to satisfy the math requirement for a degree and four terms of math before the student can take transfer-level math.

 

At ECC, there are several interesting findings. First, despite a decrease in the number of students taking placement tests, there was an increase in the number of students who took a placement test and subsequently enrolled at ECC. Second, this report illustrates the disparate levels of college preparation that incoming students possess. Over the last five years, transfer-level placement rates remained relatively stable within assessment, but varied widely between Reading (45%), Writing (40%), and Math (10%).

There are also several interesting findings from Compton Center. First, a large percentage of younger students entering Compton Center demonstrated a need for courses at the basic skills level. More than half of tested students placed into basic skills reading and math. Second, overall basic skills placements have decreased over the past five years.

 

These findings underscore the fact that ECC and Compton Center serve a student body with varied levels of college preparation. To read the full reports, as well as many other student outcome reports, click here.

 

 

By Preston Reed, PhD

3D Printing

From bikinis to prosthetic limbs, 3D printing covers a wide spectrum of possibilities.  Officially labeled additive manufacturing, 3D printing falls within the realm of advanced manufacturing. The notion of three-dimensional printing may sound complex but the process is not and its applications are astounding. 3D printing occurs when a digital file, uploaded by the user, is converted into a physical product. The procedure involves printing three dimensional objects by adding one layer on top of another, utilizing a wide array of materials such as plastic, metal, sand, ceramic, glass, clay, food products or possibly living tissue. A variety of items have been created using 3D technology such as hearing aids, ears, prosthetic limbs, earrings, cell phone cases, cakes, bikinis, chocolate, toys, models, replicas  and dental braces.

3D printing and other advanced manufacturing techniques present job opportunities in manufacturing and other industries. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that overall employment in the manufacturing industry is expected to decline slightly between the 2012 and 2022 decade while jobs in the advanced manufacturing subsector are projected to build. In fact, 3D printing is expected to be valued at $8.41 billion by 2020. Consequently, 3D technology could propel job growth in other industries including but not limited to fashion, consumer products, medical, automotive, education, food and aerospace. In fact, the field could create and increase opportunities for a variety of occupations such as Project Engineers, Marketing Research Analysts, CAD/CAM Programmers, CNC Programmers, Biomedical Engineers, Process Engineers, Programmers, Mechanical Drafters and Graphic Designers.

3D technology has a bright future but training is needed. A study conducted by the Center of Excellence revealed that some employers had difficulty finding applicants with 3D modeling/printing knowledge and/or other advanced manufacturing experience. Additionally, employers noticed a gap in current education offerings and actual skill requirements. Some community colleges and universities have developed programs to introduce 3D technology into curriculum and acquired 3D printers for students to gain practical knowledge.  El Camino College currently has two 3D printers.

The federal government is supporting additive manufacturing by giving $30 million to create America Makes, a group of community colleges, universities, non-profits and manufacturing firms that will offer additive manufacturing training.

To find out additional information about 3D Printing, please select the following link:

http://californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu/ProgramstoWatch.aspx

By Tanysha Q. Laney

Sources:

2014 Manufacturing’s New Momentum

Advanced Manufacturing, Center of Excellence, December 2013

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Time to Completion (2012-2013)

On Friday, May 16th, many El Camino College students, faculty, and staff will be attending the 67th commencement ceremony to celebrate the class of 2013-2014. For many, this marks the end of their time here at ECC, but the beginning of the next phase of their lives (whether that is employment, transferring to a 4-year institution, or another goal). Have you ever wondered how long students typically spend at ECC or ECC Compton Center en route to completing their certificate or degree?

We recently released an annual report examining the time to completion for students who earned a certificate or degree in the 2012-2013 year.

Time to Completion 2012-2013

This report examined the time between first enrollment and completion for the 3,008 degrees and certificates awarded at El Camino College (ECC) and ECC Compton Center (Compton Center) during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results showed that few students finished a degree within their first two years (10% ECC, 6% Compton Center), with median times to degree of 4 years for ECC, and 4.5 years for Compton Center.

Certificate earners had similarly modest completion numbers, with 17% of ECC and 18% of Compton Center students completing their certificates within normal time. The median time to completion for certificate earners was 4 years at ECC and 3.5 years at Compton Center. Results are disaggregated by gender, ethnicity, age, and units completed.

One thing that may impede a student’s velocity through their academic program is taking too many classes that aren’t directly tied to their goal. Of all degree earners, 32% at ECC and 23% at Compton Center had earned more than 90 units.

Degree units earned 2012-2013

It is not clear why students earned more than 90 units – it could be that students previously earned a different degree or certificate, were pursuing a double-major, changed their major after taking several courses, or that students were not focused during their initial time at ECC or Compton Center. It is hoped that the latter will be less likely to happen in the future with the usage of educational planning during matriculation.

Read the full report on our website.

 

By Preston Reed, PhD

Hispanic Student Degree Attainment and College Completion

On Tuesday April 15th, the group Excelencia in Education released a report detailing Hispanic college degree attainment and completion across the U.S., overall and by state. Examining California, there is a drastic difference in the percentage of those who had an associate degree or higher between Hispanic adults (16%) and all adults (38%). By looking through the report, we can see where El Camino College compares to other schools, and what opportunities we have to help reduce the educational equity gap.

Using 2011-2012 federally-reported numbers, the report also examined the top 5 institutions in Hispanic enrollment, associate degrees awarded, and bachelor degrees awarded. Notably, the top 5 Hispanic-enrolling institutions in California were all community colleges. Among 2-year institutions, El Camino College (ECC) was just outside of the top 5 in Hispanic student enrollment (12th) and awarding degrees to Hispanic students (8th). Numbers presented in the report considered El Camino College (ECC) and ECC Compton Center separately. If enrollment numbers were combined from both locations, ECC would rank 4th in California and 17th in the nation. If associate degree completion numbers were combined for both campuses, ECC would rank 5th in California and 28th in the nation. It is also important to note that these numbers are based on the 2011-2012 academic year. Given the increasing numbers of degrees over the past few years, we look forward to seeing where El Camino ranks relative to other schools when more updated information is released.

The report reminds us that in order to reach our goal of degree attainment by the year 2020, 1) colleges can close the college completion equity gap; 2) increase the overall number of degrees awarded; and 3) scale up programs and initiatives that work to improve attainment of Hispanic and other students (e.g., Puente project, Math Jam – similar to “Summer Math Academy” at ECC, Encounter to Excellence, and MESA).

See the full brief here: http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/college-completion/ca
Read the brief - you can thank us later!

 

By Preston Reed, PhD

Summer Math Academy Report (Summer 2009-2013)

We recently released a report examining student outcomes from the Summer Math Academy (SMA).  The El Camino College (ECC) SMA is a three-week program designed to equip students with the tools necessary to succeed in mathematics courses taken at ECC in order to graduate and/or transfer.  One way that SMA assists students in achieving their goals sooner is by allowing students the opportunity to retake their math placement test at the conclusion of the SMA.  The object is for students to place higher and be able to achieve their educational goal while taking fewer courses.

This report followed 371 SMA students to assess placement improvement and course success across four different cohorts (summer 2009, 2011, 2012, and 2013).  At the conclusion of the program, more than half of all SMA students improved their math placement by one, two, or three levels.  Compared to their peers, SMA students succeeded in their math classes at slightly higher rates (57% vs. 53%).  Though this difference was not significant, it suggests that SMA students were not placed beyond their capabilities relative to other math students, and were able to save time on their progression through the basic math sequence.  Participation in the SMA resulted in 87 semesters of math saved by those students.

Summer Math Academy Student Flow Chart

Note. Student Success = grade of A, B, C, IB, IC, or P. Non-SMA student success rate: 53% (11,990/22698)

This report finds that the SMA is achieving its goals, though there is room for improvement.  For example, more than one-third of all SMA students failed to enroll in a math class the following fall semester.

For the full report, click here.

For more information on the Summer Math Academy, click here.

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