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2014 Student Success Scorecard

By Marci Myers

It is that time of year again. The 2014 Student Success Scorecard is here!

Released in April 2014, the Student Success Scorecard is annually reported by the Chancellor’s Office. The Scorecard data is available for each of the 112 community colleges to inform how well colleges are doing in remedial instruction, job training programs, retention of students and graduation and completion rates.

Here are some system-wide highlights from 2013:

  • 167,946 certificates/degrees system-wide
  • Effects of budget constraints: Enrolled students dropped 22% in 5 years and CSU transfers declined by 20%
  • 77% of students are unprepared for college
  • College readiness linked to completion: 71% of prepared students complete, while only 41% of unprepared students do.

72% of El Camino College students and 90% of Compton Center students from the most recent Scorecard cohort were unprepared for college.

ECCCCCheck out these 2014 Scorecard Summaries for each campus:

2014 Scorecard Summary Page – Compton Center

2014 Scorecard Summary Page – ECC

Or explore the Scorecard on the CCCCO website.

 

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El Camino College Assessment Test Results by Gender and Ethnicity: Fall 2009 – Fall 2013

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ECC Transfer-level placements by ethnicity

Earlier this month, we released reports examining the placement scores of recent high school graduate students (“El Camino College Assessment Test Results Fall 2009-Fall 2013”). Recently, we took a closer look at student placements in reading, writing, and math classes separated out by gender and ethnicity at both ECC and ECC Compton Center.

The class in which a student is placed can be very important; a student placed into a transfer-level course is beginning begins several semesters closer to a degree or transfer than a student placed into a basic skills course. For example, a student who places into the most remedial math class offered at ECC (basic arithmetic) is three levels below degree credit and four levels before transfer credit courses. This translates to at least three terms of math before a student can take a course to satisfy the math requirement for a degree and four terms of math before the student can take transfer-level math.

There are several interesting findings at ECC. First, men were more likely than women to place into transfer-level math (and conversely, women were more likely than men to place into basic skills math). Second, both African American and Latino students were less likely than White students to be placed into transfer-level and more likely to be placed into basic skills reading, writing, and math. African American and Latino students were also less likely than White students to be placed into English 1A.

There are also several interesting findings from Compton Center. Similar to ECC, both African American and Latino students were less likely to be placed into transfer-level and more likely to be placed into basic skills reading, writing, and math than White students. African American and Latino students were also less likely than White students to be placed into English 1A. Second, men were more likely than women to place into transfer-level reading and math.

These placement figures should be considered when planning interventions to encourage student success at ECC. It should also be noted that assessment placements are only one of the multiple measures that can be used by counselors to determine the appropriate class placement for a student. Counselors may also consider high school grades and GPA, high school courses taken, AP test scores, faculty assessment, and Early Assessment Program (EAP) test results.

To read the full reports, as well as many other student outcome reports, click here.

 

By Preston Reed, PhD

El Camino College Assessment Test Results Fall 2009 – Fall 2013

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ECC Placement Rates Fall 2009 – 2013

As we progress through summer break, a whole new cohort of recent high school graduates are preparing to start at El Camino College (ECC) in the fall. After applying, one of the first steps that incoming students complete is to take placement tests for reading, writing, math, English as a Second Language (ESL), or chemistry. We recently released reports examining 5-year placement trends for incoming high school students at both ECC and ECC Compton Center.

 

The reading, writing, and math tests place students in a variety of levels depending on test performance. For this report, placements are grouped into categories of similarly-leveled courses. These groups are 1) transferlevel—courses that are equivalent to courses at a 4-year institution, 2) collegepreparatory—courses that immediately precede transfer-level courses, and 3) basic skills—courses defined by ECC as basic skills courses (in most cases, more than one level below transfer).

 

The class in which a student is placed can be very important; a student placed into a transfer-level course is beginning begins several semesters closer to a degree or transfer than a student placed into a basic skills course. For example, a student who places into the most remedial math class offered at ECC (basic arithmetic) is three levels below degree credit and four levels before transfer credit courses. This translates to at least three terms of math before a student can take a course to satisfy the math requirement for a degree and four terms of math before the student can take transfer-level math.

 

At ECC, there are several interesting findings. First, despite a decrease in the number of students taking placement tests, there was an increase in the number of students who took a placement test and subsequently enrolled at ECC. Second, this report illustrates the disparate levels of college preparation that incoming students possess. Over the last five years, transfer-level placement rates remained relatively stable within assessment, but varied widely between Reading (45%), Writing (40%), and Math (10%).

There are also several interesting findings from Compton Center. First, a large percentage of younger students entering Compton Center demonstrated a need for courses at the basic skills level. More than half of tested students placed into basic skills reading and math. Second, overall basic skills placements have decreased over the past five years.

 

These findings underscore the fact that ECC and Compton Center serve a student body with varied levels of college preparation. To read the full reports, as well as many other student outcome reports, click here.

 

 

By Preston Reed, PhD